Check-In Poetry: Bringing Groups to Life, Virtually

January 9, 2018 2 Comments

“At times our own light goes out and is rekindled by a spark from another person. Each of us has cause to think with deep gratitude of those who have lighted the flame within us.”

– Albert Schweitzer

Image by Neighya, shared under provisions of Creative Commons Attribution License 2.0.

During virtual meetings with the groups and networks we support at IISC, a regular practice is to begin each call with a personal check-in and often an offering of some kind (poem, quote, video). We do this to set a tone for our meetings, to hear and honor each and everyone’s voice, and to move beyond “business as usual,” which can take the form of a certain kind of doing (“getting down to business”) that may not make room for relationship-building and tapping into other sources of support and inspiration for collective and long-term work. 

On a recent IISC staff call, a few of us noted that in recent months many of those with whom we work seem to really crave these check-in times and are willing and even eager to spend more time there, hearing from one another and soaking in the exchange. I was particularly struck by a call last week with the leadership team of a national advocacy network and both the quality of and appreciation for what was shared. Our check-in question was “What did you get from your break that you are bringing into 2018?” As each person shared, there was a palpable sense of tuning in to and gratitude for one another. I had taken notes of the check-ins as they were happening and was contemplating what might be done with them beyond that time of sharing when one of the team members shared the following poem via email, comprised of a mash-up of the various answers:

Uncompromising fierce love of babies

Glittering opportunities for happy hospitality

Calling things what they are

Seeking power out of loss

Listening with attention

Fighting back with sincerity and strength

Focused energy and collective emotional health for real change

Prompting rest and relaxation and playfulness

As I read these lines, I was reminded of the poet Elizabeth Alexander’s observation that what many of us crave in these challenging times is nothing short of “radiance,” “words that shimmer,” and “light in the spiritual darkness.” It was inspiring to see how this light was shared, passed from one to another and grew during our call.

I also thought of one of my favorite lines from William Carlos Williams:

It is difficult to get the news

from poems

yet [people] die miserably every day

for lack

of what is found there.

I sense that to be very true. How about you?

How are you creating room for radiance and poetic connection in your social change work?

What does this look like and what is the result?

2 Comments

  • Beau Stubblefield-Tave says:

    “Poetry is not a luxury.” Audre Lorde

    Plan to reread this essay as soon as I return to my office this morning. It complements this column beautifully. If you haven’t read Lorde’s essay, you’re in for a treat. It is in her collection, Sister Outsider, along with The Master’s Tools Will Never Dismantle the Master’s House, and many other powerful writings.

    Maya Angelou said:

    “They may not remember what you said. They may not remember what you did. They will remember how you made them feel.”

    • Curtis Ogden says:

      Beau,

      Thank you for your comments, and yes, that essay of Lorde’s is one that I have read and re-read. Grateful for the reminder, and for the Maya Angelou quote.

      Best,

      Curtis

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