The Pandemic’s Silver Lining

March 16, 2020 Leave a comment

Constitutionally,  I tend toward remaining calm and seeing possibilities. This might not be true for everyone. I do know, however, that there is clear evidence that what we talk about influences our moods.

With that in mind, I am sharing a list of things I have seen amplified in the last week – things  that contribute to social health and well-being and long-term survival, even as we adjust to a world that feels topsy turvy.

Intersectionality

Some people are taking this moment to recognize that the Coronavirus, like all things, affects us differentially. There is some attention to the fact that those who are already burdened because of chronic health issues, or because fewer resources are invested in their communities, or those who experience racism day in/day out, are experiencing this moment on top of these existing inequities. And it is important to see the resources and resilience that these highly impacted communities do have! 

Lived expertise

We are reminded that, in fact, there are people who have lived through similar times of epidemics and uncertainty and lack of attention. How can we turn toward those who lived through and created through the start of HIV/AIDS? What can we learn from disability rights activists and people living with chronic illness? How can we use this moment to honor the wisdom of those who have related life experience….and pay them for their knowledge?

Slowing

Many of us experienced an extra busy week—our regular work and then we’re being called to use our personal or work leadership to think well about others, to plan for drastically different economic models, and to attend to family and colleagues. Amidst that, I also experienced a sense of radical slowing as I realized that my current pace of life is changing. I had a long business trip planned for March that would have allowed for slowing and I know I was craving that. I am going to ask myself how I can get that need met while staying put. This weekend, I let myself wake when I needed to wake rather than setting an alarm, and I then  settled into each day at a slower pace.

Interconnectedness

There are people who are able and willing to lead with generosity. I spoke with a stranger yesterday who said she had purchased two rolls of paper towels so that she might share one with someone who needs one, even though she had been laid off recently. I’ve asked a family member if he would be willing to help parents working at home with baby sitting if doing so can be done safely for all.

What are the ways that we can continue to connect even if we are not in proximity? What are the ways that we can look at those maps of disease spread and vectors and use it not to become fearful but to see how we are connected globally?

Within a work sphere, we are connecting with others in similar work to share best thinking and talk about everything from joint responses to pooled resources. We are looking at networks that we support and seeing how they are activating for mutual support and for the sharing of ideas. We are asking how we can support one another as colleagues in an increasingly virtual workplace. More on this as it emerges.

Care for our planet

Is there a way to live through this public health moment and not be more aware that our planet needs our attention and love? We should all know about the climate crisis and that shifts in behavior on a massive and structural scale are needed to heal. And, I believe that this global pandemic is a concrete example of what climate crisis in an interconnected world looks like.

Humor

Laughter is curative! I have been relaxed and relieved this week with humor, from hilarious memes about bras as masks and lesbians with lanyards solving the world’s crisis to silly jokes about farting in public as a way to mask a cough. And laughter on the phone with friends and colleagues about the absurdity of the moment. It is helpful that I live with a very funny human being (thank you,son!). 

Not knowing

There is a lot we do know and yet COVID-19 is surely a reminder that so much is emergent and not known. We are reminded that knowing can only happen collectively—from decisions about whether and when to close an office to determining how best to support an organization through challenging times and how best  to support hourly workers, many of whom have no access to benefits. We must think together, more than ever, during these challenging times. I’ve experienced the power of  this all week at work as we navigate in this moment, asking what individuals need, how we can support networks of leaders to think together, and – all along the way – as we remember to admit what we don’t know.

Creativity

Here at IISC we have been interacting virtually more and more over the last two years, facilitating meetings and connection through video applications. Colleagues are generating a lot of ideas and willingness to share knowledge with one another and more broadly with the world. Let’s be creative and equitable, thinking well about how to connect and how to support those most vulnerable in this moment.

And, given that words matter so much, I am adopting a rephrase that I heard this morning from my daughter: Let’s practice physical distancing. Socially, let’s work, think, laugh and slow down together, albeit remotely! Let’s be hyper-connected, spending time with one or two people in our households or our apartment buildings or neighborhoods, connecting by phone and text, with video when possible, and by taking walks and smiling at others along the way

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