Author Archives for IISC

September 10, 2020

Civic Engagement, IISC-Style

Dear Friends of IISC,

Engagement in our electoral process is a critical way to make our voices heard for social change and racial justice. MassVote, a non-partisan, non-profit organization that seeks to increase voter participation in our state and advocates for electoral justice, says it all here: Importance of Voting

No election in the US electoral cycle is more important than a presidential election such as the one coming up on November 3 of this year. 

Will you join us in participating in one of the most important elections of our lifetime by REGISTERING to VOTE?

Make sure you, your family members, neighbors and friends are all registered to vote. It’s easy to do with this online voter registration platform

Mail in your ballot, vote absentee or vote in person on Tuesday, November 3, 2020

Once you are registered to vote, check the requirements for voting in your state and mail in your ballot well in advance of Election Day or go safely to the polls with a mask and sanitizer on November 3rd.  

Complete your 2020 Census application. 

It’s not too late to complete the 2020 brief census online application which ensures that your community, neighborhood and city accesses critical funds and resources for schools, health care, and roads.

Take advantage of these voter information resources if you live in Massachusetts.

If you are a voter in Massachusetts, learn more here about who is running for elected office, how to get more information about the candidates, when and where you can vote (particularly in light of COVID-19), and more.

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June 26, 2020

From Trauma to Transformative Futures: Four Dimensions

As you review the framework, would you share your responses to the questions below in the comments?

  • What does it bring up for you?
  • Where do you find yourself focusing your thinking and efforts?
  • What might you want to explore, start, continue or further develop, or stop doing in any of the stages?How does the framework help you prioritize and perhaps find empowering areas for action and partnership?


As you navigate the complex times of COVID-19 and racial uprising, consider what it would take to transition through these four dimensions, what needs to be in place, what is already in place, and what we need to reimagine and rebuild.


1 – In the Trauma Dimension: How are we responding to the impact of trauma from COVID, racism, and other shocks?

Racial Equity & Justice:

  • Are we removing racialized barriers to emergency resources? 
  • Are we using a racial equity impact analysis tool to understand and evaluate our response? Even when we feel rushed?
  • Are we recognizing deep racial harm in our organization and networks?

Collaboration:

  • Are we pausing and engaging in quick and meaningful stakeholder engagement to guide our responses and ensure less harm?
  • Are we attending to both relationships and results as we carry out our work?

Love:

  • Are we acting and responding with humility, empathy, and transparency?
  • Are we practicing presence and accountability?

Networks:

  • Are we tapping into diverse networks to gather information and foster flows to address critical needs?

2 – In the Reckoning Dimension: How are we grappling with deep distress and the reality of shifting resources? How are we embracing racial uprisings for change? How are we embracing uncertainty?

Racial Equity & Justice:

  • Are we acknowledging inequities revealed by crisis?  
  • Are we acting to undo the racialized impacts of our actions?
  • How are we recognizing the leadership of Black people and what are the lessons for our organizations?
  • Are we remembering and communicating that equity is not the same as equality
  • Are we designing from and with the margins to approach every problem and solution?

Collaboration:

  • Are we engaged in transparent and collaborative decision-making?
  • Are we facilitating conversations and activities to face the pain and opportunity of this crisis, our potential power together to make change, while also planning for next steps?

Love:

  • Are we embracing where people are? Their feelings, conditions, perspectives?
  • Are we modeling vulnerability as a sign of strength?
  • Are we exploring the reality through the lens of love and possibility?

Networks:

  • Are we setting strategic direction with critical partners? 
  • Are we listening for and following the ideas of BIPOC communities (Black, Indigenous, people of color)?

3 – In the Healing Dimension: How are we creating the conditions for healing and well-being?

Racial Equity & Justice:

  • Are we supporting BIPOC people and communities to move through trauma, grief and anger toward joy?
  • Are white people leaning into discomfort, trauma and pain, and working that through with other white allies?

Collaboration:

  • Are we generating and living into community care guidelines to support self-care and collective well-being?
  • Are we designing and facilitating in ways that allow people to process holistically – intellectually, physically, emotionally, and spiritually?

Love:

  • Are we convening grounding conversations that allow for brave space, emotions, and truth sharing?
  • Are we offering resources for healing modalities?
  • Are we acknowledging all paths to healing?
  • Are we meeting pain with action and redistributing power and resources?

Networks:

  • Are we deepening networks and attending to flows of resources that create healing and well-being for people?
  • Are we setting up more distributive structures focusing on regenerative flows of resources of many kinds?

4 – In the Transformative Futures Dimension: How are we envisioning and living into equitable and resilient futures?

Racial Equity & Justice:

  • Are we pivoting from supremacist and extractive practices to what is liberating and life-honoring?

Collaboration:

  • Are we facilitating leaders to envision and invest in equitable and resilient futures?

Love:

  • Are we encouraging building futures from the lessons of love, possibility, and shared humanity?

Networks:

  • Are we fostering a new level of learning, sustainability, innovation and radical collaboration with people and our planet?
  • Are we focusing on systems change and building long-term movement?

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May 13, 2020

IISC is sharing reflections…

In these unsettled and challenging times, many of us at IISC are finding ourselves inspired to actively share our reflections. We welcome your comments and reactions. And we wish you all so much love and good health. Together, we will make it through to the other side.

Bringing a Network Theory Perspective to These Times – Part One by Curtis Ogden… and Part Two

We have to work on-line: “Don’t they get it?!” by Matt Thompson

Living (and Working Virtually) in Uncertainty by Cynthia Silva Parker

Shared Leadership: We are all Guardians by Kelly Bates

The Pandemic’s Silver Lining by Miriam Messinger

Pandemic: A Poem for these Times by Lynn Unger

A Framework for this Time: Collaborative Change Lens by Kelly Bates

Living and Working Virtually in Uncertainty: Balancing the Dimensions of Success by Cynthia Silva Parker

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March 16, 2020

Pandemic: A Poem for These Times

By Liz Ungar, 3/11/2020

What if you thought of it
as the Jews consider the Sabbath—
the most sacred of times?
Cease from travel.
Cease from buying and selling.
Give up, just for now,
on trying to make the world
different than it is.
Sing. Pray. Touch only those
to whom you commit your life.
Center down.

And when your body has become still,
reach out with your heart.
Know that we are connected
in ways that are terrifying and beautiful.
(You could hardly deny it now.)
Know that our lives
are in one another’s hands.
(Surely, that has come clear.)
Do not reach out your hands.
Reach out your heart.
Reach out your words.
Reach out all the tendrils
of compassion that move, invisibly,
where we cannot touch.

Promise this world your love–
for better or for worse,
in sickness and in health,
so long as we all shall live.

Lynn Ungar is a minister for the Church of the Larger Fellowship, an online congregation for Unitarian Universalists and other religious liberals.

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February 4, 2020

Twitter Talks Breakthrough Facilitation

As IISC Senior Associate Curtis Ogden was scrolling through Twitter, he came across a post from Adam Kahane of Reos Partners who shared five practices for breakthrough facilitation. IISC enjoys teaching the tools of facilitation through our signature workshops. We offered additional ideas using our lens of equity to build on his ideas. 

See how our team responded:

@adamkahane tweeted on Jan 7, 2020

Five simple (but not easy) practices for Breakthrough Facilitation from Adam Kahane

1.     Listening – beyond providing expertise

2.     Cultivating – beyond producing an agreement

3.     Accompanying – beyond directing

4.     Pivoting – beyond following a roadmap

5.     Partnering – beyond standing apart or above

Cynthia Sliver Parker, IISC Senior Associate, added:

  • Unmasking – shining a light on power, inequity, and dynamics in the room
  •  Reframing – challenging unnamed assumptions, insisting on a systems analysis of the issues being discussed rather than blaming individuals
  •  Centering – putting the experiences, wisdom, needs, and aspirations of people suffering the effects of racism, sexism, and other forms of oppression first

Melinda Weekes-Laidlow, IISC Affiliate Consultant, added:

  • Surfacing (beyond politeness, or emergence)
  • Sensing what is being experienced or felt but not acknowledged, named or legitimated

Kelly Bates, IISC President, added:

  • Sensing and surfacing the unnamed
  • Bringing out voice of those at the margins
  • Holding all people and complexities
  • Creating intentional and brave space
  • Raising up authenticity and transformative vulnerability
  • Modeling challenging power in the room
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July 16, 2018

Taking Another Look at Where Power Comes From

blog_image_power

This is a repost of a third in a series of posts on power, facilitation and collaborative process that former IISC Senior Associate Linda Guinee wrote back in 2010. Last week we reposted Linda’s piece “What is Power Anyway?,” which followed a new post by a few of us on power and meetings. Enjoy!

More about power and group processes. There have been a mountain of books written about the “bases of power” and the “types of power”.  I’ve done some work to try to boil it down – and find thinking about this very useful in moving forward the conversation about how to address power issues in group processes.

In the 1950s, French and Raven put out a proposal about five “bases” of power, which others added to. Bases of power are what gives a person or group power. French and Raven came up with these five:

  • Reward Power – power that comes from the ability to reward the other party for complying
  • Coercive Power – power that comes from the ability to punish the other party if they do not comply
  • Legitimate or Normative Power – power that comes from accepted group, community or societal norms or values which are generally viewed as “legitimate”
  • Referent Power – power that comes from being identified with a person or group (for example, so and so gains power by being friends with X or being a member of Y group)
  • Expert Power – power that comes from the perception that the person or group has knowledge

Morton Deutsch later added a sixth:

  • Ecological Power – power that comes from being able to control one’s social or physical environmental in such a way that the modified environment induces a desired behavior or prevents an undesired behavior.

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November 29, 2017

Strategies for Creating Space for Conversations on Racial Equity

Increasingly, social sector organizations are applying collaborative change frameworks and tools to engage in racial equity transformation. In a pattern reflective of the broader movement for racial justice, employees, often women of color in particular, are challenging organizational commitment to racial equity internally and programmatically. Often people who are ready to take action want to know what they can do to create space for the conversations needed to catalyze racial equity transformation.

The list of strategies below was generated by Marlon Williams, Ratna Gill, Madeline Burke and Kimberly Dumont, during our Fundamentals of Facilitation for Racial Justice Work workshop held in NYC earlier this month.

  1. Data: Use data to identify and initiate a conversation about inequities
  2. Training: Invest resources in training to staff to learn about racial equity and create the space for them to bring insights back to the organization
  3. Elevate Voices: Look for expertise throughout the organization’s hierarchy and give power to those with the capacity to lead, regardless of position.
  4. Personal Capital: Leadership and those with significant person capital can use if in service of prioritizing conversations about equity.
  5. Crisis: Incidents in the news that highlight the impact of our racial disparities can serve as a call to action.
  6. Personal Ownership: A commitment to racial equity should be owned by specific individuals throughout the organization’s structure.
  7. Outside Voices: Bring in outside voices to validate the need and urgency for having a focus on racial equity.
  8. Highlight the Loss: Identify the the risks or potential loss of not having a focus on racial equity.

Have you tried any of these strategies? Is your organization embarking on a journey of racial equity transformation? We can help.

 

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June 21, 2017

IISC Welcomes Kelly Bates as New President

On behalf of the Board of Directors of IISC, I am delighted to announce that Kelly Bates has been appointed president of the Interaction Institute for Social Change effective June 15, 2017.

Since assuming the role of interim president in October 2016, Kelly has successfully led IISC with a sure hand through a time of significant organizational change, working effectively with the Board and staff to strengthen our organization. More recently, Kelly has pivoted to addressing IISC’s future direction and vision, launching and leading a joint Board-Staff strategy team and coordinating this with a comprehensive re-examination of IISC’s business model.

For those of you who do not yet know Kelly well, her appointment as our permanent president will draw on her 20+ years leading advocacy, racial justice, and women’s organizations.  Prior to IISC, Kelly was the founding executive director of the Elma Lewis Center for Civic Engagement, Learning, and Research at Emerson College. She also served as the executive director of Access Strategies Fund, a social justice foundation funding organizations to expand democracy in communities of color and low-income communities. For ten years, Kelly led a consulting and training practice specializing in working with social change organizations and other institutions in the United States around issues of power, diversity, and organizational development. Read Kelly’s full bio here.

As we approach our twenty-fifth anniversary under Kelly’s leadership, the Board looks forward with great excitement to further strengthening IISC and – along with IISC’s talented and committed staff and our valued partners and affiliates – to shaping the next chapter in IISC’s future. Please visit our website to learn about our current work and services.  And stay tuned as we roll out our new racial justice organizational training and announce plans for the celebration of our 25th anniversary!

Very best wishes,

Frank Robinson

Chair of the Board, IISC

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June 7, 2017

Seeing Collective Impact Efforts with a Racial Justice Lens

A couple of weeks ago, IISC was invited to offer a post-conference session at the Collective Impact Forum Conference in Boston. The title of this 8 hour session spread over two days was “Advancing Racial Justice Through and Within Collective Impact.” This was an opportunity for Cynthia Silva Parker and Curtis Ogden to formalize our ongoing efforts to bring IISC’s core collaborative methods, frameworks and a variety of racial justice content and tools to the different elements of the Collective Impact framework.

We were heartened to see and hear the many conversations about racial equity during the main conference proceedings, and noted good and challenging questions and exploration about the fit between the Collective Impact model, such as it has been formally presented and understood, and community organizing and power building work. These conversations continued in some form or fashion during our session. Read More

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February 25, 2016

On the Evolving Nature of Community

Ikeda Center Podcast Episode 5: Ceasar McDowell – On the Evolving Nature of Community

Here is Part 3 of The Ikeda Center Podcast’s interview series with Ceasar McDowell.

Listen here

In this final segment of our three part interview, Dr. Ceasar McDowell introduces some early experiences that have inspired his work in community development.  He also discusses the evolution of how we organize ourselves as human beings in community.  He comments that while in the past we were born into specific communities or chose communities that were local and familiar, now “all of that has changed.”  He adds that “we often find ourselves in places where we can’t then build an integrated community, so we look at how do we then take care of that other part of ourselves, which we can say is spiritual, relational, whatever it may be…For some people, they start to do it around work, or they do it around their habits, or they do it around church…All of that still keeps us separate, because now you’re holding this multiplicity of the places where you’re finding your identity and yourself and your connection, and it ends up being fragmented in some ways.”  Dr. McDowell continues by exploring this new space that we find ourselves in, one of transition and change.

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February 3, 2016

The Transformative Work of Big Democracy

Here is Part 2 of The Ikeda Center Podcast’s interview series with Ceasar McDowell.

Listen here

In the second of this three part interview, Dr. Ceasar McDowell details his vision for democracy as an ongoing process of interaction and engagement.  He shares that the work of democracy is “how people come to know and understand both each other, the issues that are important to them, and how they want to make meaning together.”  He adds that his current work is focused on the idea of Big democracy which he describes as, “an aspiration. And at the core of this aspiration is the belief that the public is fully capable of working together to create sustainable, just, and equitable communities. But to do so the public must have ongoing, peaceful ways to interact around traditions that bind them, and interests that separate them, so they can realize a future that is an equitable improvement on the past.”

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February 2, 2016

Micro-inclusion: A small step to include someone

Since the origins of this country we have been embedded in a belief about the hierarchy of human value, a belief that some lives are more important than others. Two examples of this clearly expressed are racism and sexism. As long as this belief system persists, it will undermine democracy.  One way it shows up is as microaggressions, those little bitty acts that say to someone, “you don’t belong, you can’t be trusted, you’re less-than”. It’s a message a black man gets crossing the street in front of a car when people lock their doors. Or the catcalls a woman gets walking down the street. Brain scientists are teaching us that these types of aggressions are deeply wired in our brain and to change them we actually have to change the experiences that people have.

An antidote to microaggressions are micro-inclusions. These are little symbolic actions that force us to recall our humanity. They’re acts of humanity that signal to those at the margins they are included.

Micro-Inclusions_Definition-SocialMediaGraphic_Final

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